1.800.360.0603

GE Healthcare Camden Group Insights Blog

Matthew Smith

Find me on:

Recent Posts

GE Healthcare Included in Fortune Magazine's Healthcare Tech Reinventors List

Posted by Matthew Smith on May 19, 2017 11:00:00 AM

Fortune Magazine recently previewed what a tech-optimized healthcare future might look like and identified 21 innovative companies in five categories—each of which is challenging the conventional approach to medicine.

GE Healthcare made Fortune Magazine's' list of reinventors with its work building a hospital command center at the Johns Hopkins Hospital

Of the partnership between GE Healthcare and the Johns Hopkins Hospital, Fortune writes:

"Cutting costs and catching on to illnesses as early as possible are major goals for this type of tech. But it can also be used to combat administrative headaches like long hospital wait times. Last October, GE Healthcare and the Johns Hopkins Hospital launched a fully digital hub to better manage everyday operations. The Judy Reitz Capacity Command Center gets a constant influx of data about important events at the hospital; it receives about 500 messages every minute from more than a dozen different Hopkins IT systems and with the help of predictive analytics turns this swamp of data into suggestions for action that prevent bottlenecks and get patients both into and out of the hospital faster.

And, according to Johns Hopkins at least, it’s showing impressive early results. The hospital says the command center has shaved more than an hour off the time it takes to dispatch an ambulance to another facility and that emergency room patients are assigned a bed 30% faster than before."

To read the full article in it's entirety on the Fortune Website, please click the button below:

Hospital Command Center 

Contact GE Healthcare to request more information about hospital command centers via the button below:

Capacity Command Centers

Topics: Hospital Command Center, Fortune Magazine, Healthcare Technology

3 Key Priorities in the Perioperative World

Posted by Matthew Smith on May 18, 2017 10:48:47 AM

By Nehal Koradia, RN, MBA, and Ryan Treml, GE Healthcare Camden Group

As has been the case for many years, hospital organizations continue to look to perioperative services to be one of the most important financial engines for the institution – consistently looking for ways to maximize the utilization and efficiency of the department.

As reimbursement declines, new payment models are being explored, and hospitals continue to consolidate, organizations are expanding on and moving beyond past methods to drive improvement. Here are key priorities in the perioperative world that healthcare leaders should keep in mind:

1. Be more deliberate and detailed in linking the strategic plan to perioperative services.

Evaluate volume against capacity. Volume has historically solved most problems. However, with reimbursement changing towards value-based payment, volume has to be analyzed much more thoroughly. The days of adding volume without first understanding the total capacity available and the corresponding costs – labor, equipment, supplies, etc. – are gone. Organizations are tackling this challenge by becoming more specialized in their elective volumes – creating centers of excellence to combine specialty services and procedures in a common location to drive extremely efficient day-to-day processes. In addition, they are increasing their focus in shifting outpatient volume to ambulatory surgery centers, embracing the ability to utilize technology and new techniques to transition traditionally inpatient cases to an outpatient environment. Advanced institutions are also making the tough decision to truly rationalize their capabilities – thoroughly evaluating their market and understanding what the community truly needs and can support long-term. All of these options attempt to maximize the organizations utilization of their highly specialized resources.

Match recruitment to the strategic plan. As noted above, forward thinking organizations are pursuing surgical volume that matches their strategy. Similarly, as these organizations evaluate or recruit potential new surgeons, they are taking much more time than they have historically to consider capacity variables. Equipment and staffing capabilities are usually considered when making offers to surgeons, however rarely does an institution evaluate the inpatient capacity needs for the new surgeon joining and determine the optimal day to allocate block time to both maximize OR and IP Capacity. In order for the entire organization to run efficiently, there has to be a good match between the new providers' needs and the access the organization can provide.

2. A refined focus on operational processes and cost.

Embrace systems-thinking and advanced analytics to inform process improvements. It is well known that the elective surgical schedule typically accounts for more variation in inpatient census than ED admissions. Managing that variation is extremely difficult – very few institutions have been able to create a surgical schedule that maximizes OR utilization while also efficiently smoothing the downstream IP volumes. However, it's becoming more common to utilize simulation and forecasting tools to appropriately match inpatient resources to the demand created by surgical inpatient volume. Nursing, support personnel, ancillary services, etc. are being staffed with much more flexibility to allow for the daily, weekly, and monthly variation in inpatient surgical volume. In addition to these dynamic staffing concepts, organizations are focusing on inpatient operational processes to ensure that downstream capacity is not a limiting factor in growing surgical volume. Units are being re-purposed, the benefits and risks of specialization vs. generalization are being analyzed in detail to ensure that beds are available and utilized in the most efficient manner.

Make difficult decisions regarding supply cost. Organizations have always reviewed surgical supply cost and understood that there were opportunities to streamline/standardize, but the most advanced have taken the difficult step in convincing their surgeons to work with them to manage cost. This requires a very detailed dissection of case cost information while balancing it with quality and utilization measures. Often, the supply opportunity is only viewed from the cost perspective, and decisions are made that can impede utilization, extend case lengths, and impact outcomes. High performing organizations understand these situations and include the information into a surgeon's balanced scorecard – often driving change through awareness rather than forced decisions.

3. Establish governance, don't just talk about it.

Use the governance structure to execute strategy. Governance of perioperative services has typically been a term associated with policy development and enforcement. The problem is that it quickly becomes detached from the consistently changing healthcare environment. Surgeons that sit on committees such as Surgery Executive or Block Management are asked to manage with a set of policies that are infrequently reviewed or refreshed. They are asked to align with strategic imperatives and plans, but are not included in the development discussions. Organizations have realized this is not an effective structure to drive true governance and are incorporating these key strategic decisions into their surgical committees. This drives better alignment with the surgeon community, shortens the adoption of key changes, and actually makes policy enforcement much easier.

Hire a Chief Surgical Officer (CSO). To build on the concept of incorporating strategy into governance, hospitals are hiring a surgeon to drive the surgical portion of the strategic plan. This role is different than the chief of surgery – the CSO is part of the executive team and is involved in the development of the strategic plan, drives the recruitment of new surgeons, and balances the wants of the surgeon community with the needs of the hospital system. This role helps buffer the often contentious relationship between surgeons and the administrative suite – complementing the Chief Medical Officer.

Even though many organizations recognize that these changes need to occur to ensure future success, many have difficulty implementing these strategies due to the complex environment in perioperative services. But overcoming the difficulties and implementing even one to two of these strategies can increase revenue and/or decrease cost significantly for an organization, making it well worth the effort.


KoradiaN.jpgMs. Koradia has been leading healthcare organizations through transformation initiatives for over nine years. Ms. Koradia has worked with many large academic centers and community hospitals to transform their operating rooms, decrease readmission rates, and increasing early morning discharges and reducing ER wait times by utilizing simulation modeling, Lean, Work-Out®, and CAP® methodologies. These initiatives have allowed organizations to improve access for patients, streamline operations and improve financial performance, while creating a culture of continuous improvement. She may be reached at nehal.koradia@ge.com

 

treml.jpgMr. Treml is a manager with GE Healthcare Camden Group, with 12 years of management consulting experience. He has led a broad range of engagements including: improving perioperative service departments through scheduling optimization and specific process improvements, developing comprehensive capacity strategy plans for high occupancy institutions, implementing electronic event reporting tools, streamlining discharge planning processes, and increasing throughput in diagnostic imaging departments. He may be reached at ryan.treml@ge.com

 

Topics: OR Optimization, Hospital Operations, Nehal Koradia, Ryan Treml, Perioperative Services

The Seven Strategic Levers of Value-Based Care

Posted by Matthew Smith on May 10, 2017 1:52:29 PM

Hospital leaders are carefully watching the healthcare industry’s transformation from volume-driven care to value-based care. But while most leaders understand the basics, many are uncertain about how to guide their organizations through this transformation.

The good news is that focus will pay off. Healthcare leaders can guide the development of a value-based organization by concentrating on a handful of key priorities. We have described a list of seven strategies that we call the “levers” of value-based care, ranging from advanced cost management to comprehensive data aggregation.

To immediately read this article in its entirety, please click the button below.

Value-Based Care

Topics: Value-Based Care, Daniel J. Marino, Healthcare Data

Facing Bundled Payments

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 20, 2017 11:05:07 AM

By Dominic Foscato, Vice President, GE Healthcare Camden Group

Change in reimbursement isn’t waiting for tomorrow. It’s happening right now. Rather than paying for each procedure and office visit, government and private health plans are moving toward a payment model based on the health of an organization’s patient population. During this transition, an organization’s success depends on its ability to manage a variety of payment models.

Health care organizations must successfully administer these payment models — which continue to evolve and grow more complex —while optimizing quality, outcomes and patient satisfaction. In short, they must manage “fusion reimbursement” or risk significant cuts in revenue.

Clinical Integration, Clinically Integrated Networks

Reprinted with permission from the February 2016 issue of Trustee magazine, vol. 69, no. 2. © Copyright 2016 by Health Forum Inc. Permission granted for digital use only

Topics: Bundled Payments, Value-Based Payments, Alternative Payment Models, Dominic Foscato

New White Paper Download: Top 10 Characteristics of High-Performing Healthcare Organizations

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 18, 2017 11:30:49 AM

By Darryl Greene, MS, Vice President, and Robert Green, MBA, FACHE, CHFP, Senior Vice President, GE Healthcare Camden Group

high-performing healthcare organizations

Prompted by the Affordable Care Act and numerous other environmental factors, many healthcare organizations, physicians, employers, and newcomers to the industry have been simultaneously focusing on multiple objectives to decrease an unsustainable cost of care growth while improving the quality of care and access for millions of patients. A question for healthcare organizations to consider is how to remain relevant to patients and financially viable in an industry that has been in and will likely continue to be in a constantly developing landscape?

We have observed consistent and common characteristics or attributes among the leaders and many of the employees who work in the highest performing organizations. Our new White Paper discusses 10 characteristics to consider as you journey through this sometimes uncertain and sometimes turbulent, but always challenging and many times rewarding industry we call healthcare. 


GreenB1.pngMr. Green is a senior vice president and the practice lead for the financial operations and transaction advisory practice at GE Healthcare Camden Group. He has more than 26 years of healthcare experience with 13 years of healthcare consulting experience and 13 years of provider-based financial, operational, and strategic experience among health systems, hospitals, medical groups, management services organizations (“MSOs”), and physician hospital organizations (“PHOs”). Mr. Green has significant expertise in building high-performing teams and leading and executing transformational change. He may be reached at robert.t.green@ge.com. 


d.Greene-1.jpgMr. Greene is a vice president for the strategy and leadership practice at GE Healthcare Camden Group. He has more than 18 years of strategy to execution consulting experience, including 11 years in healthcare. He has significant expertise in strategic planning, business management systems implementation, talent management, performance improvement, leadership, and leading and executing transformational and culture change. He may be reached at darryl.greene@ge.com. 

 

Topics: Top 10, White Paper, Robert Green, Health System Integration, Staff Planning, Darryl Greene

Which Do You Prefer…Tax Preparation or a Visit to the Doctor?

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 17, 2017 11:12:52 AM

By Robert Zisman, Vice President, and Mark Krivopal, MD, MBA, Vice President GE Healthcare Camden Group

Spring is here, and Tax Day is almost upon us. Hopefully you’ve filed your taxes. You’re not one of those procrastinators, right?

It’s hard to miss the noise related to potential changes in healthcare and tax policy. Given all the talk on these two topics, comparisons of these two “facts of life” cannot be avoided.

Our united view: As divided as our country may be at times on these two issues, it’s easy to miss where we are united. Most people don’t enjoy doing their taxes, nor do they enjoy going to the doctor. Understand the necessity? Absolutely. Enjoy it? Likely not.

So, let’s explore our common lack of enjoyment for these two industries and dream a bit as to how these experiences could catch up to those we truly enjoy (or at least look forward to).

Access: For most people, booking an appointment with a tax pro or completing your taxes online isn’t that bad. However, finding time on your doctor’s calendar or researching the right provider for a specific ailment tends to be a bit more challenging. Once you’re in—especially if you’re the first appointment of the day—congratulations, you’re golden! If you receive any other appointment slot, be prepared to wait. Sometimes after waiting weeks and months for the appointment in the first place, you realize that you need a different specialist to help you with a problem.  

Ability to figure it out on your own: Fortunately, the ability to do your taxes online has been simplified by companies like TurboTax and their proclamation, “You answer simple questions about your life. We do all the math.” The good news here is that taxes are fairly formulaic, so this approach can work. They also have online experts available for questions. On the healthcare side, when someone has a health issue, where do they turn? You guessed it – Google. Not the best idea when there are websites out there such as WebMD where you can utilize a symptom checker and online doctors to answer questions you may have. While the possibility exists in both industries to figure it out on your own, many still prefer meeting with your tax pro or doctor, eye-to-eye.

Ability to meet eye-to-eye… from your couch! When it comes to doing your taxes online, the market hasn’t dictated the need for video chat. While taxes are complicated - and no two returns are the same - they don’t have feeling or emotions (although many can admit to having wept silently and experienced a sense of loss after pushing the “file your return” button). On the other hand, the human connection in healthcare is still extremely important and virtual doctor visits are beginning to take off. Health insurance coverage is finally catching up to market demand, and several experts predict the number of virtual visits to double over the next several years. However, few physician practices have adopted virtual visits into their care delivery system and workflows. Yet some pioneers have figured this out and offer a glimmer of hope for the future of virtual medicine. For example, Kaiser Permanente performs more virtual visits than in-person office visits. Other progressive healthcare systems are dipping their toes in the world of telemedicine with a focus on improving convenience and reducing costs.

Value for the dollar and payment: Whenever paying for a service, it’s expected that you receive value in return for the money you spend. With taxes, we start with a formulaic approach set by the government. Then, each person has their own, unique opportunity to impact that approach. Fees are usually stated up front, but somehow they always seem to change (rarely decreasing) by the end of the tax meeting. However, if you receive a refund, those fees usually aren’t too hard to swallow (i.e. H&R Block – Get your billion back!). When visiting the doctor, it feels eerily similar—except you often don’t know how much your visit, tests, and procedure will cost until you receive several bills post-visit. Unfortunately, paying your medical bills is far more complicated and seems never-ending. And you don’t get money back…unless you mistakenly pay the same bill twice. Greater transparency from the healthcare system’s side—as well as simplified processes and enhanced consumer engagement—must be developed to improve the overall experience.

You receive the best possible outcomes based on data and science: The tax code itself is extremely complex (74,000 pages) and no two returns are the same. H&R Block recently took a step in the right direction by partnering with IBM’s Watson. They’ve taken H&R Block’s 60 years of experience and 600 million data points to figure out how to deliver each customer the best outcome--in most cases, a refund. In healthcare, it seems we still have an opportunity to catch up. When seeing a doctor in person, the digital data capture of that appointment has not kept up with advancements in other industries. You often check off your symptoms, review your medical history (sometimes electronically, more likely in a manila folder) and arrive at a solution that we “believe” will address the symptoms outline. The ability to use data, artificial intelligence, and predictive analytics is becoming more prevalent in healthcare and will soon transform how you interact with your doctor, how hospitals are managed, and more. There are some great highlights recently mentioned on this topic by The Economist.

Looking to a better future: It seems both industries and experiences are making advancements to move up the likeability chain. Yes, potential policy reform still lingers above both industries, but ultimately improving the experience will rely more on innovation led by the public and private sectors. We welcome your thoughts in the comments section below on which experience you like the most and what these industries can do to move up your likeability list.

P.S. Just one more day left to file. Don’t miss the deadline!


Robert_Zisman.pngMr. Zisman leads the GE Healthcare Camden Group’s US operations team, responsible for recruiting, staffing, marketing, business development, operations and knowledge management. He also leads efforts related to 3rdparty strategic partnerships and collaboration with GE Healthcare Partners consulting businesses around the world in areas such as Canada, Latin America, Europe and the Middle East. His previous roles included leading large and complex engagements focusing on improving key performance metrics such as growth, margin, quality, patient satisfaction, and sustainable results. He may be reached at robert.zisman@ge.com.

krivopal_M-963748-edited.jpgDr. Krivopal is a vice president with GEHC Camden Group and an accomplished senior physician-executive with 19 years of healthcare experience across the continuum of care. Dr. Krivopal is responsible for developing and leading innovative, value-based programs addressing client needs in healthcare organizations, hospitals, and physician practices focusing on transformational system integration strategies, service line optimization, throughput and clinical leadership development. His experience spans not-for-profit and privately held organizations of various sizes as well as start-up environment in the healthcare information technology space. He may be reached at mark.krivopal@ge.com

Topics: Patient Access, Patient Activation, Robert Zisman, Mark Krivopal, Integrated Care Delivery

What Can Clinically Integrated Networks Offer Physicians?

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 13, 2017 9:00:00 AM

By Mark Krivopal, MD, MBA, Vice President, GE Healthcare Camden Group

Much has been written about clinical, post-acute care facilities and physicians, has led health system executives to invest substantial financial and human capital to set up infrastructure and operating processes that improve value in health care.

These organizations intend to be prepared for current and future challenges such as increased regional competition, government regulations and payment reform. If the value proposition of these organizations is articulated and delivered in a genuine patient and physician-centric way, significant rewards can be gained not only by the health system itself but also by its individual physicians.

To continue reading this article and the 10 considerations for physicians when deciding whether to join a CIN, please click the button below.

NOTE: This article is password protected on the American Association for Physician Leadership website, but may be accessed by logging in with the following credentials:

Login: gehccamden@ge.com
Password: gehccamden
 
Clinical Integration, Clinically Integrated Networks

krivopal_M.jpgDr. Krivopal is a vice president with GEHC Camden Group and an accomplished senior physician-executive with 19 years of healthcare experience across the continuum of care. Dr. Krivopal is responsible for developing and leading innovative, value-based programs addressing client needs in healthcare organizations, hospitals, and physician practices focusing on transformational system integration strategies, service line optimization, throughput and clinical leadership development. His experience spans not-for-profit and privately held organizations of various sizes as well as start-up environment in the healthcare information technology space. He may be reached at mark.krivopal@ge.com

 

 

Topics: Clinical Integration, Clinically Integrated Networks, Physician Leaders, Mark Krivopal

What Clinically Integrated Networks Offer Physicians

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 12, 2017 3:05:58 PM

By Mark Krivopal, MD, MBA, Vice President, GE Healthcare Camden Group

Much has been written about clinical, post-acute care facilities and physicians, has led health system executives to invest substantial financial and human capital to set up infrastructure and operating processes that improve value in health care.

These organizations intend to be prepared for current and future challenges such as increased regional competition, government regulations and payment reform. If the value proposition of these organizations is articulated and delivered in a genuine patient and physician-centric way, significant rewards can be gained not only by the health system itself but also by its individual physicians.

To continue reading this article and the 10 considerations for physicians when deciding whether to join a CIN, please click the button below.

NOTE: This article is password protected on the American Association for Physician Leadership website, but may be accessed by logging in with the following credentials:

Login: gehccamden@ge.com
Password: gehccamden
 
Clinical Integration, Clinically Integrated Networks

krivopal_M.jpgDr. Krivopal is a vice president with GEHC Camden Group and an accomplished senior physician-executive with 19 years of healthcare experience across the continuum of care. Dr. Krivopal is responsible for developing and leading innovative, value-based programs addressing client needs in healthcare organizations, hospitals, and physician practices focusing on transformational system integration strategies, service line optimization, throughput and clinical leadership development. His experience spans not-for-profit and privately held organizations of various sizes as well as start-up environment in the healthcare information technology space. He may be reached at mark.krivopal@ge.com

 

 

Topics: Clinical Integration, Clinically Integrated Networks, Physician Leaders, Mark Krivopal

Measuring the Importance of the Human Side of Change

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 10, 2017 1:59:30 PM

By Elina Spule, MBA, Senior Consultant, GE Healthcare Camden Group

Have you ever been part of a change that was very successful? Have you ever experienced a change that was not very successful? What were some of the key elements that distinguished each of them?

Research conducted by GE across hundreds of change initiatives concluded that “100% of all changes evaluated as ‘Successful’ had a good technical solution or approach. Over 98% of all changes evaluated as ‘Unsuccessful’ also had a good technical solution or approach.1

So what is the differentiating factor?

I posed this question to 23 individuals during the Change Acceleration Process (“CAP”) training that I led at one of the premiere healthcare systems in the nation, and these were some of the answers regarding successful change initiatives:

  • There was a strong leader
  • The change was sustained
  • People supported it
  • Staff understood why we needed to do it
  • There was a strong communication
  • The team was knowledgeable
  • The team was aligned
  • The new process was better than the old one
  • People were excited
  • It had a start and an end date
  • People were recognized for their hard work

I then shared with the class that one of the key concepts in this class is the formula Q X A3 = E1 that translates into the following:

Quality of Solution     x     Alignment       =      Effective Results

Acceptance

Accountability

This means that in order to have effective results, it is not enough to simply have a great solution (e.g., a new process, a better system, a new technology, a new strategy etc.) but one has to gain the human buy-in for this new solution.

For example, as a part of a project to reduce denials for a certain type of lab tests, a client developed a payer grid (a solution) that would help administrators determine upfront which tests are covered by which payers and which are not.

Let’s assume that on an arbitrary scale of 1-10 where 10 is the best, the quality of the grid is at 8 (it is regularly updated, it contains a comprehensive list of payers, it is user friendly, etc.).  But if we don’t have the buy-in from the clinic administrators to use it, the change formula would be as follows—indicating there will be no results.

8 x 0 = 0

Look what happens when we spend just little more time explaining why we need to adopt this new grid, what we hope to achieve with it, and how to use it. The results already are much better!

8 x 33 = 216

Now imagine what would happen if we spent little more time planning who should be on the team, how to involve our stakeholders, and how to communicate it better. Our results could be more like:

8 x 83 = 5632

That’s already 26 times the difference!

While we were reviewing the formula, one of my colleagues helped me organize the ideas that the class brainstormed and provided across the change formula Q X A3 = E1 as to the differentiating factor between successful and unsuccessful changes. What do you notice about it?

qae.pngDuring our outcomes based process improvement projects, we encourage our teams to take it one step even further – can you look for ways to measure all three sides of the equation? As the old saying goes: “If you can't measure it, you can't manage it.” I have listed below some of the ideas related to measuring the denials project:

qae2.png

Although this particular initiative is still ongoing, our historic experience shows that it is possible to achieve process improvements of greater than 50 percent improvement. However, it is critical to focus on and measure both sides of the equation: the quality of the technical solution as well as the human side of change.

Think about the current change that you are implementing or your organization as a whole: What would a typical Q X A3 = E equation look for you? What do you measure on your process improvement process? How have you measure the alignment, acceptance, and accountability?

1 Slide 14 in “Change Acceleration Process” (CAP) training developed by GE Crotonville

Change Acceleration Program (CAP)


Spule.jpgMs. Spule is a senior consultant with GE Healthcare Camden Group specializing in the areas of outcomes based process improvement and clinical transformation. Ms. Spule has also experience in capacity strategy, governance, analytics, and leadership development. She is a GE Master Change Agent certified to teach and coach process improvement and change management. She may be reached at elina.spule@ge.com. 

 

 

 

Topics: CAP, Change Leadership, Change Acceleration Program, Elina Spule

Top 10 Characteristics of High-Performing Healthcare Organizations

Posted by Matthew Smith on Apr 4, 2017 3:34:17 PM

By Darryl Greene, MS, Vice President, and Robert Green, MBA, FACHE, CHFP, Senior Vice President, GE Healthcare Camden Group

The following is an abbreviated version of ourwhite paper with the same title. For the full white paper, which offers additional insights on each characteristic or attribute, please click on the button at the bottom of this page.

Prompted by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and numerous other environmental factors, many healthcare organizations, physicians, employers, and newcomers to the industry have been simultaneously focusing on multiple objectives to decrease an unsustainable cost of care growth while improving the quality of care and access for millions of patients. A question for healthcare organizations to consider is how to remain relevant to patients and financially viable in an industry that has been in and will likely continue to be in a constantly developing landscape?

We have observed consistent and common characteristics or attributes among the leaders and many of the employees who work in the highest performing organizations. Here are 10 of these characteristics to consider as you journey through this sometimes uncertain and sometimes turbulent, but always challenging and many times rewarding industry we call healthcare. Some of the characteristics below are basic, but well worth mentioning again because of their foundational importance.

1. Continuously Learning, Well-informed, and Insightful. These organizations understand the current environment with an eye toward the future change trajectory. It is only by keeping a constant pulse on the numerous environmental factors that have multi-faceted impacts such as political (government), economic (market segment), social (population), and technology (information, devices, web) that high-performing organizations can begin to make meaning of the trends and organizational changes required. In turn, they can set their course and pursue imperatives that best position them to be successful in this dynamic environment of healthcare.

2. “Change-Forward” with Bold, Inspiring Vision. High-performing organizations are not satisfied with incremental change, but desirous of “breakthrough, transformative change.” They are not just “change ready,” but embrace change management as a competitive advantage. The type of change underway in healthcare is clearly significant, and the pathway to the transition from fee-for-service to value-based care is not a clear one. It is being discovered through pilots, trial and course correction, and some failed attempts.

3. Agile and Adaptable.  High-performing organizations continue to pursue strategy and find value through staying agile and adaptable. Because the world is accelerating the time frame, the strategy needs to be more flexible and “opportunistic” and is rarely beyond one to three years with an emphasis of planning the specific goals of the most immediate year. Prioritizing the change underway for the organization according to strategic pillars and related value proposition is important to manage the diverse portfolio of imperatives. These pillars translate into multiple project efforts that are more synergistic with similar goals (and measures to impact). For example, improving OR throughput, while addressing readmission issues, and while creating new care models of evidence-based care, are not an unusual portfolio of programs with different timelines and needs of an organization.

4. Actionable Information-Oriented. These organizations understand how to translate data into data analytics, into information, into transparent, actionable-information and ultimately, into “predictive analytics.” Many organizations are challenged by the following: overall analytics framework that does not outline and prioritize information or reporting needs; overlapping reporting efforts across various analytics silos; limited transparency and understanding of reporting capabilities and queues of each silo; and limited or no understanding of alignment of analytics efforts against strategic and operational goals. Unfortunately, much of this disarray and uncertainty stymies action or creates “analysis paralysis.” Many high-performing organizations have analytic strategies to ensure they are leveraging data and actionable information to gain a strategic market position and incorporate that into their value-based payer strategies. When successful in addressing the challenge of “actionable information,” these high-performing organizations can, for instance: Improve access to care across the network; create information architecture in support of population health initiatives; continually improve provider network’s performance while decreasing spend; evaluate clinical programs and initiatives and understand the effect of the interventions and return on investment; and reduce out-migration of patients and better understand referral patterns across the network.

5. Financially Disciplined. High-performing organizations have financial discipline as a priority. This is to meet the vision and mission of the organization while achieving a financial balance between the capital needs and financial capabilities. This translates to clarity on the level of strategic investment the organization can make relative to an overall operating profit and loss portfolio and credit rating objective. A well-integrated, strategic, financial, and capital planning process is paramount to achieving the balance. Defining the financial goals forecasted out 5 years and annually, along with clear objectives designed to meet the expected well-defined capital needs is a key goal.

6. Respectful and Optimized Staffing. One of the greatest “wastes” in healthcare is not deploying staff at their “highest and best” use. With labor typically comprising more than 50 percent of any hospital or health systems expenses – salaries, wages, and benefits are typically a common “target” for cost savings. Unfortunately, an “across the board” cut or an even more focused reduction in force, tends to never get to the “root cause” of underlying disjointed, ambiguous, and sometimes even broken processes, and certainly the savings are never sustained.

High-performing organizations engage their staff from the “ground up” or by the “diagonal slice” in helping to resolve the long-standing challenges of more efficient and effective care. These organizations will assess the entire “human capital value chain,” ensuring best practices in strategy and talent management (workforce planning, employee engagement, learning and development), workforce management (scheduling, staffing and assignment, span of control, productivity, coaching and mentoring) and human capital operating model (reporting and analysis, improve and control, training, benchmarking).

7. Accountable and Execution-Focused. Many organizations, if not most, struggle with implementation and effective execution. The reasons are numerous: inability to effectively prioritize; multitude of initiatives dilutes effectiveness; “analysis paralysis”; “no one is accountable”; and overwhelmed staff already busy doing their “day jobs.” Effective transitions from direction setting and strategic planning by the leadership of the organization to execution by the middle management and frontline levels of the organization are done best by high-performing organizations. High-performing organizations have found a nuance to increase accountability – creating venues to ensure bi-directional input between owner and sponsor for the imperative, project, or task – at the organization level and the local level at which the individual contributes. And what to do when the accountability goes beyond the four walls of the hospital? At a time when leadership extends to new groups and partners, some of which are not inside the four walls of the hospital this bi-directional exchange and development of local plans to deliver are critical to best create ownership.

8. Patient-Centric and Operationally Proficient. These organizations are focused on standardizing care processes, embracing clinical protocols, and effecting seamless, patient access. Efficient and effective operations discipline in the way care is delivered and supported, as well as, broad and deep ongoing improvement efforts, are key attributes of high-performing organizations. Maximized operational efficiency with top-decile clinical quality is the priority, with emphasis on areas that impact patient access, patient flow through the system, and effective discharge to the right post-acute care entity (“right care, right place, right time”). As well, standards set relative to evidence based care and effective standard care plans for treatment types are important to providing reliable care with reproducible patient experience and quality outcomes. Process improvement work is a key enabler to achieving these goals through practices, tools, and methods addressing waste elimination, improving inefficient operations, redesigning care processes, and standardizing work delivery. Additionally, many high-performing organizations are utilizing real-time decision-making driven by predictive analytics, enabling ability to accommodate capacity demand, complex transfers, ED boarding, and PACU holds while driving seamless patient access and maximizing resource utilization.

9. Creative Collaborators. A key attribute is partnerships and joint ventures with other providers, payers, employers, clinical technology companies, and other key stakeholders, all intended to create and increase value for patients and communities. Many organizations are challenged in determining the right value-based payment arrangement programs and investments to set up over a multi-year window (3-5 years) to realize the organization’s strategic vision and achieve financial strength. For high-performing organizations, it starts with addressing the basics of creating reliable quality care highlighted in patient centric and operational proficiency. Along with this, high-performing healthcare organizations expand this focus to connect and align the fragmented system of care delivery to improve patient experience, cost, access, and quality outcomes vertically and horizontally across the care continuum. This effort is incentivized by CMS’ continued transition to value-based payment reimbursement. New partnerships are expected, aligning physicians, payers, employers, providers, and consumers helping healthcare payments transition more quickly from pure fee-for-service to alternative payment models. Identifying the clinical programs, care models, and care interventions coupled with aligning and coordinating the physicians in the care continuum around common goals of value-based care, is a priority. Population health models and clinical and financial integration vehicles will continue regardless of administrative or legislative action as employers, providers, and patients are expecting and even demanding greater value.

10. Realizing the Value of System Integration.  Many healthcare organizations, in pursuit of economies of scale and scope, have acquired a collection of overlapping units that have failed to achieve the intended goal of system integration and transformation. High-performing organizations create value through economies of scale and scope with system integration and optimizing synergies. They enact a unifying vision, strategy, processes, technology, and especially culture to achieve improved performance expected as an integrated system. With a deep understanding of financial operations and clinical care as well as the related decision-making structures and processes, high-performing organizations tend to work a customized problem-back approach to system integration, understanding the “precious few” areas to focus on that will be prioritized and sequenced in a way that creates the most value for the organization.


This top 10 is an abbreviated version of our white paper with the same title. For the full white paper, please click the button, below.

high-performing healthcare organizations


GreenB1.pngMr. Green is a senior vice president and the practice lead for the financial operations and transaction advisory practice at GE Healthcare Camden Group. He has more than 26 years of healthcare experience with 13 years of healthcare consulting experience and 13 years of provider-based financial, operational, and strategic experience among health systems, hospitals, medical groups, management services organizations (“MSOs”), and physician hospital organizations (“PHOs”). Mr. Green has significant expertise in building high-performing teams and leading and executing transformational change. He may be reached at robert.t.green@ge.com. 


d.Greene-1.jpgMr. Greene is a vice president for the strategy and leadership practice at GE Healthcare Camden Group. He has more than 18 years of strategy to execution consulting experience, including 11 years in healthcare. He has significant expertise in strategic planning, business management systems implementation, talent management, performance improvement, leadership, and leading and executing transformational and culture change. He may be reached at darryl.greene@ge.com. 

 

Topics: Top 10, Robert Green, Health System Integration, Staff Planning, Darryl Greene

Subscribe to Email Updates

Value Model, Health Analytics

Posts by Topic

Follow Me