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GE Healthcare Camden Group Insights Blog

Redefine Your Practice's Care Team to Promote Patient-Centered Care

Posted by Matthew Smith on May 20, 2016 11:13:16 AM

Article and video courtesy of MGMA.com

“If we’re not making the patient the boss right now, someone else is going to get our business. It’s as simple as that,” said William Faber, MD, MA, MS, senior vice president, GE Healthcare Camden Group, who spoke about the changing patient relationship during the MGMA/AMA Collaborate in Practice conference, March 20-22, Colorado Springs, Colo.

Faber and Marc Mertz, MHA, FACMPE, MGMA member, vice president, GE Healthcare Camden Group, elaborated on the topic during an exclusive video interview with MGMA [video below].

“We’re reaching a crossroads,” Mertz says. “Historically, practices have been very physician-centric in the way they operate [from scheduling appointments to physical exams]. Yet patients are increasingly demanding greater access and more information to be engaged in their care.”

Responding to that new dynamic requires a fundamental shift in practice operations. “In the past, practices competed against other practices,” Mertz adds. “Now there are retail clinics, urgent care clinics and concierge medicine. Patients will go where they can get the type of care they want.”

Accommodating Patient Demands

Meeting patient needs might require expanded hours, technology that allows patients to schedule appointments, get test results and ask questions online and a care team approach to increase access.

“The main issue is teamwork,” Faber says. “The doctor cannot just look at him- or herself as the full answer to the patient’s needs.” The more realistic answer, which will boost sagging morale, is to create a network. “Work with social workers, retail clinics, urgent care centers and care managers to address these needs,” he suggests. “Taking care of patients now is more of a team sport.”

Encouraging Change

“We are still incentivized to fill the schedule with as many patients as we can,” Mertz says. “Until some of the financial reimbursement models change, I think it will be hard for people to change.”

However, making small adjustments can ease the growing burden on doctors, Faber explains.  For example, he suggests that groups “Participate in new compensation programs that reward doctors for that which only doctors can do,” which means assigning low-acuity patients to other team members.

Collaboration between physicians and administrative leaders (dyads) is key for success. “I think of it as a marriage,” Mertz says. “They’re both jointly responsible and accountable for all aspects of the practice,” which means that neither party should shirk responsibility for clinical aspects or practical pieces of the business. “It’s a true partnership.

“Physicians are ultimately responsible for the clinical care but practice administrators need to be there to push and to challenge, to bring new, innovative technology, new processes and procedures to the table,” Mertz adds.

One new process they recommend: Create a network of facilities that provide convenient access for your patients and consider that network as your care team. “The biggest impediment is the human tendency to stay with what always worked before, just keep doing the same old thing,” Faber explains. “We’re practicing medicine as though it stayed stagnant in the 1970s or ’80s, and everything [has] changed around us.”

Watch more of the interview:

Webinar, Patient Experience, Patient Satisfaction

Topics: William K. Faber MD, Patient Access, Marc Mertz, Care Model, Care Delivery, Patient-Centered Care

Clinical Integration: There Will Be Winners and Losers

Posted by Matthew Smith on Feb 8, 2016 1:13:28 PM

Due to increasing deductibles and our improving ability to care for conditions in outpatient settings, hospital admissions have declined consistently over the past few years, and industry experts do not expect this trend to reverse. In response, healthcare systems are investing millions of dollars in acquiring physician practices and affiliating with independent physicians through clinically integrated networks in an attempt to enlarge their patient base.

Though clinically integrated networks do enlarge the patient base, one of their aims is also to reduce the percentage of admissions from that base.

There is hardly a healthcare system in a competitive market in the U.S. that is not pursuing some form of clinical integration strategy, and competition is being felt in more and more communities. Healthcare leaders know our society is headed towards payment-for-value and away from fee-for-service payment, and they do not want to be found without a competitive value-oriented structure.

Leaders should not assume, however, that just because they invest in clinical integration that their patient bases will be adequately enlarged to keep their hospitals filled. Their competitors are also spending millions on clinical integration strategies in hopes of enlarging their bases! The base does not automatically enlarge because an investment is made. Ultimately, there will be winners and losers.

More Than a Marketing Strategy

Winners will tend to get their fully functional clinically integrated network to market quicker than their competitors and ultimately, winners must create networks that perform better than those of competitors. Specifically, they will do a better job than competitors at controlling the cost of care and demonstrating higher quality and service. The creation of a clinically integrated network must not be just a marketing or physician alignment strategy – it must truly enable effective population health management.

As quality, cost and service information on healthcare providers becomes more readily available, individual consumers and employers will choose networks that provide greater value. Competition will put pressure on under-performers. Some systems that have invested in clinical integration will go out of business or be acquired by more successful systems, which in turn will downsize or divest those facilities.

Physician Competition Heats Up

Likewise, competition among physicians will heat up as consumers have more data upon which to make educated choices. Again, there will be winners and losers. Physicians who chose to not join narrow networks will lose access to patients. If there is an over supply of certain specialists in a certain geography, those who have poorer access, service or quality outcomes will get fewer referrals than others.

We like to think that no healthcare facility or provider should be forced to change or go out of business. We like to think that all of us can grow our patient bases to sustain our hospitals. We often act as if just the right number of facilities was built in a geographic area and that just the right number of physicians decided to go into each specialty. But we know at the macroeconomic level that none of this is true. Informed consumers will give us incentive to change, and some will win through effectively managing change, and some will lose by ignoring reality.

Topics: Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, Clinically Integrated Networks

9 Ways to Stimulate Patient Engagement Via 'Activation' & Empowerment

Posted by Matthew Smith on Aug 28, 2014 12:30:00 PM
By William K. Faber, MD, MHCM
Chief Medical Officer
Health Directions

Patient Engagement, Patient Activation, Accountable CareNew payment models reward health care systems and providers for improving the health of populations. Providers are understandably concerned about whether they can succeed in such models, because so much of patient health is beyond their personal control. Seventy-five percent of our health dollar is spent on chronic conditions that have everything to do with the choices made by patients, notably diabetes and degenerative joint disease as they relate to obesity. Therefore, engaging patients in the management of their own health is vital to achieving population health improvement.

At a recent national health conference, the speaker asked the audience “What is the least utilized resource in the American health care system?” After a few seconds of silence, as thousands scratched their heads for the answer, the speaker called out “The Patient!”

Accountable systems and providers will increasingly need to learn how to empower and “activate” patients, rather than encouraging their dependence on the system to provide cures. Similarly, providers and care managers will need to reach out proactively to patients, rather than passively waiting for patients to seek care.

Here are several approaches to patient “activation”:

Charge Patients with the Primary Responsibility for their Own Care

Some patients have never been encouraged to think of their disease as their personal responsibility. Remind them there are some things they can do for themselves that no one else can do for them. For instance, no amount of insulin or other diabetic medication will overcome the effects of excessive eating.

Have Patients Monitor their Own Conditions

Provide glucometers and blood pressure devices and ask patients to log their daily readings and progress. Let them know that you expect them to bring their logs (or devices that store results) to visits so you can monitor their progress. Teach them how to adjust their diets or medication to respond to their daily readings.

Encourage Use of a Patient Portal If You Have One (And Agitate Your System to Invest in Portal Technology if it Has Not Already Done So)

Make the procedure for signing up for the portal easy and understandable for the patient. Show them how to use the portal to check their own lab results or request appointments. Let them know that you want them to regularly use the portal so it can become a reliable channel of communication between you and them.

Plug your Patients Into Community and National Support Groups for their Condition

The local park district may hold free exercise classes, for instance. Many communities have free smoking cessation clinics. National organizations representing almost every major disease have websites that provide educational support materials and may introduce patients to local support groups for their condition.

Consider Group Visits

Group visits have several advantages that accrue to the providers (it saves time and enhances revenue) but one of the best outcomes of group visits is that they greatly increase patient engagement. Patients with chronic conditions gain significant emotional support and encouragement from interacting with other people “like them” who share their condition. Social support is one of the most powerful motivators of behavior. Group visits produce surprising improvements in the health of their members.

Pull Patients into the EHR Screen in the Exam Room

Electronic health records threaten the direct eye contact of health professionals with their patients. Savvy providers have learned to turn this liability into an asset by bringing the patient “into” the EHR as they work, showing them computer generated charts, for instance, that trend their blood pressure or blood sugar, or to have the patient verify their medications and doses. The EHR becomes an engagement tool and patient trust is enhanced they realize the provider is not hiding information from them.

Use In-Office Instructional Videos

Some practices run motivational or educational videos in their waiting rooms or have a learning room with a library of instructional videos on a variety of health related subjects. A well-organized file of printed educational materials is a low-tech way to achieve the same ends. The more information a patient can absorb about their condition, the more engaged they will be with their self care.

Create an Interactive Website

We know of numerous providers who have created their own webpage and blog on topics related to the health of their patients. These providers found that this strategy increased the engagement of their patients and generated new business.

Convey an Openness to Questions and Support Initiative

Consider the factors that might harm patient engagement and work to reduce them. Be there to support and respond to patients when they attempt engagement. This requires a positive response when the patient asks about their condition and how to improve it. Old-fashioned paternalism, which thwarts patient questioning, kills patient engagement. Patients respond to praise for even modest health improvements they achieve. 

About the Author

William K. Faber, MD Health DirectionsDr. William K. Faber, Chief Medical Officer for Health Directions, is a physician executive with progressive senior leadership experience. He most recently served as Senior Vice President of the Rochester General Health System in New York, where he guided the development of the system’s Clinical Integration program and assisted more than 150 providers at 44 sites through the conversion process from paper records to an Electronic Health Records system (Epic). Dr. Faber formerly participated in the governance of the Advocate Physician Partners (APP) Clinical Integration program and directed APP’s Quality Improvement Collaborative.
 

 Patient Engagement, Patient Service

Topics: William K. Faber MD, Patient Engagement, Patient Service, Patient Activation

Use a Collaborative to Build a Clinically Integrated Culture

Posted by Matthew Smith on Jul 23, 2014 1:57:00 PM

By William K. Faber, MD, MHCM
Chief Medical Officer
Health Directions

Practice Transformation Collaborative, Clinical Integration, To succeed in emerging payment models, providers must cooperate to improve patient outcomes and control costs. This requires not just new workflows, but a new provider culture. Learn how to create a Collaborative to align provider culture with the needs of a clinical integration initiative.

Traditional fee-for-service payment rewards the isolated efforts of providers. But patient outcomes are not maximized by individual effort. They are maximized by team effort. In accountable care systems, providers must coordinate their efforts to improve health outcomes and contain costs. Systems must transform both clinical operations and clinical culture to achieve success. One proven strategy for developing a new provider culture is to create a Practice Transformation Collaborative.

What is a Collaborative?

A Practice Transformation Collaborative is a longitudinal and interactive learning program that helps healthcare providers understand and use the tools of quality improvement. It brings together physicians and key clinical team members to learn practice management and quality improvement principles. It focuses them on specific quality metrics and the best evidence-based means to reach them. Participants receive practical guidance on improving office efficiency and effectiveness. They share their experiences, receive peer support and learn best practices from one another.

Used effectively, a Practice Transformation Collaborative can help providers within a CI system become adept at improving population health outcomes and simultaneously minimizing costs. Well-designed collaboratives share six key elements:

1. Clinical Leaders with Quality Improvement Experience

Effective programs are spearheaded by clinicians with experience in quality improvement. A good candidate might be a physician with an MPH or MS in Quality Improvement. Support faculty should include physicians and nurses with experience, certification or training in quality. Successful teams also benefit from instructors with expertise in lean process improvement.

2. An Operational Director

A collaborative is a large undertaking that needs a focused director. Responsibilities include developing the budget and curriculum, setting up meetings, enrolling providers, developing promotional materials, designing incentives and organizing ongoing events. This role does not need to be a full-time position. In smaller organizations, these responsibilities could be handled by a PHO director, a QI director or someone in business development.

3. A Curriculum

A strong curriculum will introduce participants to the concepts of population management, Clinical Integration, process improvement, chronic disease management and practical statistics. It is important to include a “workshop” component that gives participants an opportunity to work together, compare notes and learn from real-life projects.

4. Peer-to-Peer Interactions

The heart of a Collaborative is the peer sharing process. Instructors teach principles and give assignments, but the true learning occurs as clinicians attempt to change specific processes back in their practices and then share what they have learned with their peers. Participants can learn just as well from successes as they can from failures, and the personal sharing of successes and failures, insights, struggles and innovative ideas is both practically useful and motivational for others in the group.

5. An Ongoing Support Structure

Devise ways to support providers between sessions. One option is to require participants to turn in monthly progress reports on their projects. This could be as simple as a one-page form for reporting accomplishments and challenges. Monthly conference calls help keep participants focused on program goals. In addition, create a “tool kit” (patient education hand-outs, chronic disease management protocols, etc.) to support participants in their efforts.

6. Strong Incentives for Provider Participation

An organization could provide points towards incentive payment thresholds for collaborative participation. Other options include providing a stipend or arranging for participants to receive CME credit. It is also possible to obtain specialty board credit towards recertification for those fully participating in the collaborative.

Executive Sponsorship is Critical

As with all change initiatives, executive commitment is critical to a Practice Transformation Collaborative. Effective collaboratives are backed by a key executive leader who supports the concept, works to secure resources and provides high-level sponsorship.

About the Author

William K. Faber, MD Health DirectionsDr. William K. Faber, Chief Medical Officer for Health Directions, is a physician executive with progressive senior leadership experience. He most recently served as Senior Vice President of the Rochester General Health System in New York, where he guided the development of the system’s Clinical Integration program and assisted more than 150 providers at 44 sites through the conversion process from paper records to an Electronic Health Records system (Epic). Dr. Faber formerly participated in the governance of the Advocate Physician Partners (APP) Clinical Integration program and directed APP’s Quality Improvement Collaborative.

Topics: Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, Clinically Integrated Care, Collaborative, Practice Transformation Collaborative, Quality Improvement, Provider Participation

Six Strategies to Improve Primary Care Access

Posted by Matthew Smith on Jul 1, 2014 1:29:00 PM

By William K. Faber, MD, MHCM
Chief Medical Officer
Health Directions

Primary Care Provider, Health DirectionsPrimary care providers are the heart of clinical integration. Ready access to primary care services is fundamental to disease prevention, chronic illness management and the reduction of unnecessary testing and treatment. Unfortunately, primary care physicians are scarce and getting harder to find.

Approximately 40% of primary care physicians are over the age of 55, and many will retire before age 65. Fewer medical school graduates are going into primary care. Most primary care physicians feel stretched to capacity and often work 12-hour days, and financial incentives alone are inadequate to entice these physicians to add more patients to their schedules..

Given these constraints, health care systems need to expand primary care access through other means. Following are six strategies to increase primary care access by improving staffing models and practice operations.

1. Hire more non-MD providers

Physician Assistants (PAs) and Nurse Practitioners (NPs) can meet the needs of most primary care patients and both are more plentiful than primary care physicians. Integrating these providers into a practice will expand access for patients and allow physicians to focus on more challenging cases that require a more skilled level of expertise.

2. Sync the practice schedule to patient demand

Many practices are open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. (and closed over the lunch hour) Monday to Friday, but many patients prefer early-morning, evening or weekend appointments. Adjusting practice office hours to match patient demand will accommodate more volume, even if the total hours of patient appointments remain the same. Monday is typically the busiest day of the week in doctors’ offices; therefore, the greatest number of physician appointment hours should be provided on Monday. Similarly, patient demand is usually greatest during the winter flu season, so limit adult care providers vacations during this time. Similarly, pediatricians should be most available during school physical season.

3. Simplify appointment types and frequency

Practices create many different appointment types—well visits, sick visits, physicals, pap visits, follow-ups, etc. To better manage patient flow, reduce the number of appointment types to two: 15 minutes and 30 minutes (or any base appointment length and one twice as long). You can determine what kind of patient is best suited to each of these two types, rather than letting the name of the appointment determine whether a patient fits in that slot. Providers should also reconsider the interval at which they recommend follow-up appointments. Some physicians routinely tell their hypertensive or diabetic patients to return every three months. This clogs their schedules unnecessarily so they have inadequate appointments for those that are acutely ill. A better practice is to tailor the follow up interval to the specific patient. If they are well-controlled and self-monitored, certain patients may only need to be seen twice a year. Some patients should be seen more frequently than quarterly to keep them out of the hospital. 

4. Fix practice bottlenecks

All practices can stand to improve patient throughput and efficiency by identifying bottlenecks. Conduct a time-flow study on a sample of patients as they move through each phase of their visit. Reduce delays by redesigning processes and redeploying staff. For example, give patients a clipboard to fill out while they are in the waiting room, so they can list their concerns for the day and verify the medications they are currently taking. Better yet, let them do this through an advanced patient portal. Better patient flow can increase patient access without extending the workday.

5. Create standing orders

Staff members often ask physicians questions for which the answer is always the same. When this is the case, everyone would benefit from standing orders. An example would be a nurse waiting for a doctor’s signature on an order for a mammogram or diabetic retinal exam when it is documented that the patient is due for one of these tests. The physician can designate that they always approve under certain circumstances by creating standing orders. Rooming protocols can also improve throughput. For instance, assistants should always have diabetic patients remove their shoes and socks while rooming the patient, so the doctor can examine the patient’s feet without delay.

6. Break the “face to face” pattern

Clinical integration aims to reward physicians for improving patient outcomes. In the fee-for-service world, physicians are rewarded only for face-to-face encounters, so they have become accustomed to having patients come in to the office when it is not actually necessary. To succeed in new systems of payment, physicians must become comfortable with managing low-risk patients outside of the face-to-face visit, so they are available to see the high-risk patient who truly needs to be seen. In many cases, diagnosis and treatment over the phone is entirely appropriate.

What about patient satisfaction?

Implementing these strategies can help physicians increase their availability to patients. A more efficiently run office can actually expand that amount of “face time” a patient has with their doctor. This also opens up appointments when patients actually want to be seen, which is a big satisfier.

About the Author

William K. Faber, MD Health DirectionsDr. William K. Faber, Chief Medical Officer for Health Directions, is a physician executive with progressive senior leadership experience. He most recently served as Senior Vice President of the Rochester General Health System in New York, where he guided the development of the system’s Clinical Integration program and assisted more than 150 providers at 44 sites through the conversion process from paper records to an Electronic Health Records system (Epic). Dr. Faber formerly participated in the governance of the Advocate Physician Partners (APP) Clinical Integration program and directed APP’s Quality Improvement Collaborative.

Topics: Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, Patient Satisfaction, Primary Care Providers, Primary Care Access

Health Directions Profiled at HFMA's ANI 2014 Conference

Posted by Matthew Smith on Jun 23, 2014 4:11:00 PM

HFMA, ANI, HFMA ANI, Health DirectionsHealth Directions was profiled by HFMA for their ANI pre-conference session, "Second Generation Physician Engagement Techniques." An excerpt of the profile reads:

During a preconference session Sunday at HFMA's ANI: The 2014 HFMA National Institute on Second-Generation Physician Engagement, Daniel J. Marino, President and CEO, and William K. Faber, MD, Chief Medical Officer of Health Directions, concluded that—similar to the findings of HFMA’s Value Project—creating an effective CIN requires several key activities.

  • Health systems need to engage and recruit physicians to the CIN.
  • Systems need to engage payers that will be attracted to the CIN once it has achieved sufficient size and scale as a partner organization that can improve quality.
  • A CIN needs to align incentives for the participating physicians to support activities that lead to improved care outcomes and reduced cost.
  • For the incentives to be effective, physicians need data to not only understand their current performance relative to their incentives but to identify opportunities for care improvement.  Marino and Faber said CINs can build off this infrastructure to negotiate contracts with purchasers of healthcare to support the transition to a value-based delivery system.

To read the full profile of the precon session, please click here.

Click for PDF Flyer of the Session:

http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/161605/file-1047595058-pdf/ANI_14_EngagingPhysicians.pdf 

Health Directions will present again at ANI on Wednesday, June 25th with the following session:

The Financial Blueprint of Accountable Care

Date, Time, Location:

Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 11:00 AM – 12:45 PM (Bellini 2006)

Overview:

This session draws from multiple experiences with accountable care and clinical integration as well as direct operational knowledge of building a Pioneer ACO.

After Attending This Session, Participants Will Be Able To:

  • Recognize barriers to building a financially successful clinically integrated network
  • Learn tips and techniques to help transition to value-based care
  • Understand how to align independent physicians with the hospital’s clinical integration objectives
  • Identify methods for building financial incentives

Tools & Takeaways:

Sample incentive model to engage physicians

Speakers:

  • Daniel J. Marino, President/CEO, Health Directions
  • Meredith Duncan, Director of Operations, Seton Health Alliance

Topics: Accountable Care, Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, Clinically Integrated Networks, ANI 2014, Meredith Duncan, HFMA, Daniel J. Marino

Six Clinical Integration Articles Available as PDF Downloads

Posted by Matthew Smith on Jun 20, 2014 8:52:00 AM

Clinical Integration, Health DirectionsAs part of our ongoing commitment to our clients, social media followers, and the healthcare industry, Health Directions authors original content that is published regularly in national publications as well as on our HD Insights Blog. We create this content to educate and inform, as well as stimulate important conversation around these key topics. 

You may have read one, or all, of these articles, but we've re-packaged them for you into individual PDFs that may be downloaded and printed out at your convenience.

We hope that you receive some valuable insight from these articles and invite you to subscribe to the HD Insights Blog and comment on the articles in the Comments section, below. 

To download each article, simply click on the respective button which will automatically direct you to an online PDF. To download, right click on the page and save to your device.

Clinical Integration, Health Directions, Population HealthFunding Clinical Integration, Population Health, Health Directions

Clinical Integration, Health Directions, Population Health, Regional Clinically Integrated Networks, CINs, Health Directions, Population Health, Clinical Integration

Clinical Integration, Hospital-Physician CollaborationClinical Integration, Franchise Model, Health Directions

 HD Insights Blog, Health Directions, Blog Subscription 

Topics: Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, Physician Engagement, Daniel J. Marino, Download

Health Directions Presenting Two Sessions at HFMA ANI '14

Posted by Matthew Smith on Jun 19, 2014 2:14:00 PM

ANI, HFMA, Health DirectionsThe Healthcare Financial Management Association (HFMA) kicks off their 2014 National Institute Meeting this Sunday in Las Vegas. Running through June 25, ANI 2014 brings together healthcare financial management executives and leaders in finance & accounting, revenue cycle management, and administration/ operations. 

This year's event focuses on eight, central themes:

  • Regulatory Impact on Reform/Rules
  • Clinical Integration/Culture
  • Organizing for Value
  • Revenue Cycle
  • Payment Trends
  • Financi & Operations
  • Cost Management/Margin Transformation

Health Directions is excited to once again be a part of ANI. We have two great sessions planned for ANI attendees. They are:

We invite all ANI attendees to visit the sessions and, if interested, schedule a time to meet with our speakers aside from the sessions. If you would like to schedule a time to meet with one of our speakers, please access a request form via the button, below.

ANI, HFMA, Health Directions, Dan Marino

 _________________________________________________________________

Second Generation Physician Engagement Techniques

Date, Time, Location:

Sunday, June 22, 2014, 8:00 AM – 12:00 PM, (Bellini 2102)

Overview: 

This presentation draws from multiple clinical integration /ACO programs and distills some unique and innovative approaches to engage physicians in achieving distinguished results in the areas of: clinical integration governance; patient engagement; superior clinical results; increased efficiencies; and sustained competitive advantage for the provider organizations.

After Attending This Session, Participants Will Be Able To:

  • Understand and utilize effective approaches to engage physicians
  • Understand how to align the incentives of community physicians within a clinically integrated network
  • Integrate new approaches to build organized systems of care using data

Tools & Takeaways:

Sample incentive model to engage physicians

Speakers:

  • Daniel J. Marino, President/CEO, Health Directions
  • William K. Faber, MD, MHCM, Chief Medical Officer, Health Directions

Click for PDF Flyer:

http://cdn2.hubspot.net/hub/161605/file-1047595058-pdf/ANI_14_EngagingPhysicians.pdf

 _________________________________________________________________

The Financial Blueprint of Accountable Care

Date, Time, Location:

Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 11:00 AM – 12:45 PM (Bellini 2006)

Overview:

This session draws from multiple experiences with accountable care and clinical integration as well as direct operational knowledge of building a Pioneer ACO.

After Attending This Session, Participants Will Be Able To:

  • Recognize barriers to building a financially successful clinically integrated network
  • Learn tips and techniques to help transition to value-based care
  • Understand how to align independent physicians with the hospital’s clinical integration objectives
  • Identify methods for building financial incentives

Tools & Takeaways:

Sample incentive model to engage physicians

Speakers:

  • Daniel J. Marino, President/CEO, Health Directions
  • Meredith Duncan, Director of Operations, Seton Health Alliance

Click for PDF Flyer:

Accountable Care, HFMA, ANI, Health Directions

Topics: Accountable Care, Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, ANI 2014, Meredith Duncan, HFMA, Daniel J. Marino

New Download: Engaging Physicians In a Clinical Integration Program

Posted by Matthew Smith on May 15, 2014 2:29:00 PM

Clinical Integration, Download, Health DirectionsAs organizations begin to clinically integrate care across their patient care continuum, physician participation and engagement is critical to its overall success. Leaders of CI organizations must be able to effectively present the CI value to physicians and education community physicians.

This presentation draws from the experiences of several Clinical Integration/ACO programs and distills some unique and innovative approaches to engage physicians in achieving distinguished results in the areas of:

  • Clinical Integration Governance
  • Patient Engagement
  • Superior Clinical Results
  • Increased Efficiencies
  • Sustained competitive advantage for the provider organizations

This presentation takes real-world examples from multiple clinical integration programs
to distill best practices in engaging physicians to drive program results,
allowing participants to:

  • Unleash physician creativity to build comprehensive programs
  • Use Clinical Integration to drive product line performance
  • Engage specialists to drive hospital quality and safety performance
  • Develop governance best practices to build a culture of committed physicians
To access this presentation, please click the button below:

Clinical Integration, Physician Engagement, Health Directions

Topics: Clinical Integration, William K. Faber MD, Physician Engagement, Daniel J. Marino, Download

Population Health Dinner Event for Chicago-Area Independent Practices

Posted by Matthew Smith on May 8, 2014 3:34:00 PM

Health Directions, AthenaHealth, Population HealthJoin Health Directions and athenahealth for a private dinner event on Tuesday, May 20th (6:30 PM) at Seasons 52 in Schaumburg, IL. The presentation for the evening will be: Shifting from Volume to Value: Quality-Based Programs that Support Population Health Management. The program will be delivered by William K. Faber, MD, MHCM, Chief Medical Officer for Health Directions; and Cindy Barrett, LPN, Senior Associate for Health Directions.

Please note that this complimentary dinner event is offered exclusively for independent physician practices. 

Download PDF Flyer

Target Audiences

  • Providers
  • Physician Office Practice Managers
  • Nurses
  • Quality Improvement Staff
  • Health IT Personnel

Synopsis

Beginning this year, the reporting of clinical quality measures (CQMs) has changed for all providers participating in the EHR Incentive Program. All providers will be required to report CQMs, based on the new criteria, in order to demonstrate Stage 1 and Stage 2 Meaningful Use and successfully meet PQRS requirements.

This Seminar Will:

  • Provide information on Clinical Quality Measures to facilitate reporting quality data reporting for Meaningful Use and Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) programs
  • Use a case study to demonstrate how to implement a quality-based program
  • Discuss the value of clinical programs, population health management, clinical integration and CMS programs

Learning Objectives

  • Understand payment systems that reward value
  • Learn about the sources of quality measures
  • Acquire a methodology for selection of measures
  • Overview the HIT infrastructure to report performance
  • „Learn about programs that improve quality measures

Presenters

William K. Faber, MD, Chief Medical Officer for Health Directions, is a physician executive with progressive senior leadership experience. He most recently served as Senior Vice President of the Rochester General Health System in New York, where he guided the development of the system’s Clinical Integration program and assisted more than 150 providers at 44 sites through the conversion process from paper records to an Electronic Health Records system (Epic). Dr. Faber formerly participated in the governance of the Advocate Physician Partners (APP) Clinical Integration program and directed APP’s Quality Improvement Collaborative.

Cindy Barrett, LPN, Senior Associate of Health Directions, LLC has more than 30 years of clinical experience in the ambulatory environment, Barrett collaborates with EMR implementation support teams to facilitate and build process, workflows, post-implementation support and optimization as it applies to the EMR module. She is recognized for her expertise in EMR clinical workfl ow analyses, technical EMR system builds, training oversight, and practice support during pre-implementation, implementation, go-live and post go-live. Additionally, Barrett works with health care teams on several quality reporting programs, including Meaningful Use, PQRS and PCMH initiatives.

Location

Seasons 52
Across from The Streets of Woodfield
1770 E. Higgins Rd. • Schaumburg, IL 60173

Schedule

6:30 p.m. Registration, Cocktails
6:45 p.m. Presentation and Dinner

Registration

To register for this event, please click the "Click to Register!" button, below.

Reservations are assigned in the order in which they are submitted. Your reservation is not complete until you receive a confirming email from Health Directions or athenahealth.

Questions? Please contact Matthew Smith at Health Directions at [email protected]

Click to Register!

Topics: Population Health, William K. Faber MD, Quality Programs

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